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Beryl Patmore

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== Notes ==
 
== Notes ==
* It is ultimately unclear whether there ever was a Mr Patmore, as "Mrs" is used as a courtesy for housekeepers and cooks regardless of whether they were or currently are married. However, in [[Episode 6.01]], we witness a strained conversation between Mrs Patmore and [[Elsie Carson|Mrs Hughes]] — another holder of the courtesy title — about [[Charles Carson|Mr Carson]]'s likely expectations of her as his future bride. In that exchange, Mrs Patmore clearly insinuates that she has had no first-hand experience of married life. In [http://www.econsoc.hist.cam.ac.uk/docs/CWPESH%20number%208%20July%202012.pdf Mistresses and marriage: or, a short history of the Mrs (PDF)] (or [http://www.geog.cam.ac.uk/research/projects/occupations/abstracts/paper25.pdf]), Amy Louise Erickson states that "In the middle of the eighteenth century, 'Mrs' did not describe a married woman: it described a woman who governed subjects (i.e., employees or servants or apprentices) or a woman who was skilled or who taught".
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* It is ultimately unclear whether there ever was a Mr Patmore, as "Mrs" is used as a courtesy for housekeepers and cooks regardless of whether they were or currently are married. However, in [[Episode 6.01]], we witness a strained conversation between Mrs Patmore and [[Elsie Carson|Mrs Hughes]] — presumably another holder of the courtesy title — about [[Charles Carson|Mr Carson]]'s likely expectations of her as his future bride. In that exchange, Mrs Patmore clearly insinuates that she has had no first-hand experience of married life. In [http://www.econsoc.hist.cam.ac.uk/docs/CWPESH%20number%208%20July%202012.pdf Mistresses and marriage: or, a short history of the Mrs (PDF)] (or [http://www.geog.cam.ac.uk/research/projects/occupations/abstracts/paper25.pdf]), Amy Louise Erickson states that "In the middle of the eighteenth century, 'Mrs' did not describe a married woman: it described a woman who governed subjects (i.e., employees or servants or apprentices) or a woman who was skilled or who taught".
 
*In the companion book, "[[The World of Downton Abbey]]" by [[Jessica Fellowes]], Mrs Patmore's kitchen is described as being hot year round. And a cook's day starts at 6 am, as she begins cooking the first meal. Between upstairs and downstairs, she must work 18 hours and make eight meals a day from scratch.{{Cite}}
 
*In the companion book, "[[The World of Downton Abbey]]" by [[Jessica Fellowes]], Mrs Patmore's kitchen is described as being hot year round. And a cook's day starts at 6 am, as she begins cooking the first meal. Between upstairs and downstairs, she must work 18 hours and make eight meals a day from scratch.{{Cite}}
 
* She may have been born somewhere between 1869 or 1870.<ref name="Birth" />
 
* She may have been born somewhere between 1869 or 1870.<ref name="Birth" />
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